MUSEUM CHRONICLES

Curiosity, Wonderment, and awe

36 notes

losangelespast:

Picture postcard of the Hollywood Bowl, 1927. The shell depicted here was Lloyd Wright’s first attempt and was dismantled and replaced by his second design, an arched shell which was used for the 1928 season. The iconic current shell was added in 1929 and demolished and rebuilt in 2003-2004.

losangelespast:

Picture postcard of the Hollywood Bowl, 1927. The shell depicted here was Lloyd Wright’s first attempt and was dismantled and replaced by his second design, an arched shell which was used for the 1928 season. The iconic current shell was added in 1929 and demolished and rebuilt in 2003-2004.

(via lacma)

91 notes

amnhnyc:

From the archives: Museum staff at work on the Tiger Diorama in the Hall of Asian Mammals, February 1934
Explore all the photos from the Picturing the Museum collection here: http://bit.ly/l8nOsp
© AMNH Library/Image #281096

amnhnyc:

From the archives: Museum staff at work on the Tiger Diorama in the Hall of Asian Mammals, February 1934

Explore all the photos from the Picturing the Museum collection here: http://bit.ly/l8nOsp

© AMNH Library/Image #281096

0 notes

Dallas Museum of Art Dashboard

The transparency of this museum’s records is easy to read, understandable, and innovative. Once again, a museum has created an exemplary project that other sectors of our society NEED to replicate. 

Kudos 

0 notes

MoMa Alzheimers Project- Making Art Accessible to People with Dementia

This link includes:

  •  A guide that explains how to engage individuals with dementia and their caregivers with art.
  • A guide that details how to establish a museum program for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.
  • A guide that focuses on the structure and set-up of off-site programs at museums or art galleries and on-site programs at your facility.

"Educational programming is at the heart of a museum’s public mission and serves as a gateway for exploring works of art and cultural history. Offerings should extend to all audiences, including individuals with cognitive disabilities."-MOMA


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Notes from Dimensions

Dimensions is ASTC publication. The article discussions “Qualities of Excellent Science Center CEOs.”

1. "Ability to articulate, with passion and detail, the vision and mission of the organization." 

- Clarity of the core missions of the organization

- Be able to find your own personal meaning for your organization’s mission

2. "People skills for dealing with all the major stakeholders."

- Keep staff excited and productive. 

- The CEO must accept total responsibility for the institution

3."Enthusiasm for science, technology, engineering, and math, (or the content of your museum), and the ability to communicate that enthusiasm."

- Be a continuous a rapid learner within the field

4. "A combination of technical skills, such as fundraising, marketing, public relations, financial management, and partnership building."

0 notes

Favorite Museum Duos

                                   
  • Mom or dad and baby- This is especially amusing at art museums. The content is clearly not meant for babies, but I think the peaceful atmosphere is what draws them in. Strolling through the galleries with their large stroller, viewing art and lulling their baby to sleep, smart parent!
  • Patrons and pets- Museums typically have a no pet policy. However, that does not stop individuals for hiding/sneaking/fibbing their beloved pets into museums. Though pets don’t have a place in museums, it does brighten my day seeing a Pekingese ”service animal,” equipped with a teeny tiny “Don’t Pet me I’m Working” vest.
  • First date- A museum is a common date location. It is where young singles can show their potential mates, their intellectual side. My favorite are the obvious online blind dates that occur before my eyes. The awkward shuffle for whose paying for the tickets, where in the museum do they begin? Deciphering each others likes/dislikes and general temperament. 
  • Patron and Ipod- This duo intrigues me, what are they listening to? Does the duality of music and the material enhance their overall experience?  Are they listening to different genres of music in different galleries? 

Museum Gal San Francisco 

0 notes

What do you want from us?

Working first hand with many museum patrons on a daily basis, I am often perplexed by this question.

Education, adventure, escapism, exploration, or shared experiences with friends and family. Maybe all of those things, or none at all. 

In order to facilitate the best experience possible, you need to get a better understanding of our patrons motivations. 

What are our patrons motives for visiting?

  • Entertainment motives- I want to be entertained by the material. It’s fun, exciting and my observations amuse me. 
  • Educational motives- I want to discover new things and new information. I want to figure out how this works. I want to expand my practical knowledge.
  • Aesthetic motives- I want to view/see things that will inspire me. I want to be immersed in the material. 
  • Landmark motives- I want to see this special exhibit I will never see again. They are items or art from across the globe and it is a “once in a lifetime” exhibit.
  • Share experience motives- I want to visit the museum to spend time and create a shared experiences with loved ones. 
  • Egotistical motives- I want to go, so I can tell others I went. 

I am sure I have missed some motives, the great thing I have always add more as they are discovered..

Museum Gal San Francisco

Filed under museum motives

0 notes

3 Easy Steps for Successful Partnerships with Local Government 
1. Strong commitment to collaborate with local government officials 
Be open to partnerships, communicate to them often about what your doing, and how they can help, or how you can help them.                       
Example- Invite government agencies to table at your events or vice versa
2. Align your mission and priorities 
Make sure your museum’s mission is reflective of your community’s priorities. Make yourself relevant to them.                                                                     
Example- Get behind important local initiatives that are relative to your museum. Local governments look at museums as industry leaders in innovation and stewardship.
3. Become Valued
Through creativity and effort make local government value you as a local resource and treasure. 
Example- You nurture the next generation in the fields of arts/sciences/technology. You are playing a fundamental role in the “educational landscape” of your city, connecting students to ideas and experiences conventional education neglects. 
More Ideas
Invite local government officials and employees to museum “free days”
Develop community neighborhood nights for local residents and invite city government to participate
Offer lower rate membership for low income families 
Develop a teen intern program for local students at low performing schools 
Remember to nurture partnerships, so they are mutually beneficial. 

3 Easy Steps for Successful Partnerships with Local Government 

1. Strong commitment to collaborate with local government officials 

Be open to partnerships, communicate to them often about what your doing, and how they can help, or how you can help them.                       

Example- Invite government agencies to table at your events or vice versa

2. Align your mission and priorities 

Make sure your museum’s mission is reflective of your community’s priorities. Make yourself relevant to them.                                                                     

Example- Get behind important local initiatives that are relative to your museum. Local governments look at museums as industry leaders in innovation and stewardship.

3. Become Valued

Through creativity and effort make local government value you as a local resource and treasure. 

Example- You nurture the next generation in the fields of arts/sciences/technology. You are playing a fundamental role in the “educational landscape” of your city, connecting students to ideas and experiences conventional education neglects. 

More Ideas

  • Invite local government officials and employees to museum “free days”
  • Develop community neighborhood nights for local residents and invite city government to participate
  • Offer lower rate membership for low income families 
  • Develop a teen intern program for local students at low performing schools 

Remember to nurture partnerships, so they are mutually beneficial. 

Filed under partnerships museums government ideas